Gamma Delphinids


June 11, 1930 – Maryland; three members of the American Meteor Society reported seeing an incredibly bright meteor shower. It wasn’t the kind of evening a self respecting meteor watcher would have chosen to gaze at the sky. Overcast skies and a full moon were less than ideal meteor watching conditions. Despite the lousy conditions, and the fact no one else reported seeing them – they remained adamant about what they saw.

Scientists now believe it was the Gamma Delphinids, and 83 years later – they’re coming back -maybe. More of a best guess than a promise, chances are good that for as little as 15 minutes, an hour at most beginning 4:28 AM EDT, the night sky will sparkle with brilliant fast moving meteors.

The Gamma Delphinids meteor shower – if it shows – will appear to radiate from the constellation Delphinus (del-FINE-us) the Dolphin high in the southern sky shortly before dawn tomorrow morning June 11. This map shows the sky facing south at 3:30 a.m. local time. Delphinus is to the east or left of the bottom of the bright 3-star figure the Summer Triangle. Created with Stellarium

(The above paragraph and photo were blatantly lifted from astrobob)

http://astrobob.areavoices.com/2013/06/10/rare-delphinid-meteor-shower-may-erupt-tomorrow-morning/

If you can’t find Vega; a bright star, easily visible as a frame of reference – download the Google Sky Map app on your phone. Perhaps staying up all night to maybe wish upon a star isn’t your thing; Sky Map will bring the universe to your doorstep – never again will you ponder what that object in the sky is called.

http://www.google.com/mobile/skymap/