Remember That Little Accident at Fukushima?

Remember that little accident at Fukushima, Japan?  The catastrophic tsunami following a major earthquake on March 11, 2011? Reactors at the Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant melting down faster than ice cream on a summer afternoon? Perhaps the powers that be think we’re stupid – keep it out of the news, sweep it under the rug, and we’ll soon be tweeting about the Kardashians again. Take a few minutes to watch this video clip; then ponder how stupid we are – that little accident is more serious than “reported” and isn’t going away any time soon.

Consider not only the 300 tons of radioactive water flowing into the Pacific Ocean for days; think about the million tons of radioactive water stored in thousands of containment tanks on a hill above the plant. Plastic storage tanks with rubber seals; bolted, not welded together – tanks not expected to last five years. Tanks that would roll down the hill into the ocean should another large earthquake hit.

Radioactive rabbits jumping about, farmers who sell produce because they need to survive – but refuse to eat it themselves. Contaminated fish and shellfish – whether exported or migratory – making their way to global tables. The link below is to an FDA page listing imports banned from the area.

http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/cms_ia/importalert_621.html

Conservative estimates say it will take anywhere from 40 to 100 years before the situation is under control. Fukushima Daiichi is now considered a far graver situation than Chernobyl. Cancer rates are expected to spike within the next 2 – 5 years.

Hard as I try, the logic behind shrugging Fukushima off eludes me.

This is a good link…

http://fukushimaupdate.com/fukushima-massive-leaks-and-radioactive-fallout-continuing-on-a-daily-basisfor-years-on-end/

Storage tanks at Fukushima – courtesy ajw.asahi.com

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14 thoughts on “Remember That Little Accident at Fukushima?

  1. I think this is one of those things which is so far beyond being handled that it simply is hushed up and will remain so until someone has an actual solution, not unlike the oil spill with the broken pipe line in the gulf except the damages are a million time plus.

    A friend of mine’s job was to figure probabilities of a nuclear disaster. I wonder what he’s doing now, whether he is actively connected to this crisis and wish I could talk to him about this.

  2. Incredible video… In China, we have been talking about this for the last year and figured the ‘economics of the world’ will keep these issues silent for the long term. Thanks for posting this.

  3. When the media played it down, I never believed for a second that Fukushima wasn’t still a horrible mess. I don’t think we even know what the future affects will be. Very sad.

  4. Nuclear power aint so cheap is it? The world needs to find ways to not need these time bombs.
    Changing light bulbs and adding insulation to homes is a low cost way to have a big impact on your energy consumption. There are several companies where you can install solar panels on a lease to own program. We installed panels and in most months we put more power on the grid than we use.
    We all need to do our part and many things can be done that will not change our way of life or take a lot of money.

    • I couldn’t agree more. Unfortunately Vancouver and solar panels don’t work together too well. That said there are alternatives we should be demanding. Nuclear energy is fraught with peril – a nuclear “oops” is unacceptable.

  5. Pingback: Fukushima Fallout | notestoponder

  6. OK, but let’s not lose sight of our perspective here. Since the introduction of nuclear power in the 70’s, 1.6 million carbon fuel related deaths have been avoided. It is estimated that between 420,000-7 million carbon fuel related deaths would follow a complete phase out of nuclear power between 2010-2050. Source: NASA, http://www.giss.nasa.gov/research/briefs/kharecha_02/

    Nuclear power isn’t save and there have been and will be accidents. Renewables are the way to go and with proper investment, we could phase out both nuclear and carbon fuel power within decades. In the mean time, let’s not cut our nose off in spite of our face.

      • Interesting postscript: My wife returned from a business trip to Ukraine yesterday and mentioned casually that Ukrainians still drink bottled water to be on the safe side. Remember that little incident at Chernobyl, like, a hundred years ago.

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