Aurora, Texas 1897

I love a good UFO conspiracy – not so much for the conspiracy as the legend and folklore surrounding it. Area 51 and Roswell, New Mexico fuel UFO speculation and government cover-up to the point of hysteria. I’ll admit; depending on your frame of mind or the conviction of believers – it does pose some questions.

Pondering UFO abductions, sightings or crashes is tricky business. It’s one thing to say you don’t believe we’re alone in the universe, another to state you buy into specific cover ups. I don’t believe we could possibly be alone, that said I find it difficult to digest many UFO theories being bantered about. Cautiously forging ahead – ponder Aurora, Texas in 1897.

On April 19, 1897 the Dallas Morning News reported an incident on April 17 in Aurora, Texas. A “cigar shaped” flying object hit a windmill and  crash landed on the property of Judge J.S. Proctor. Witnesses claim a single occupant perished; the body mangled and described as “not of this world”. A Mr T.J. Weems – U.S. signal officer on duty in the area – reported to conveniently be an expert on astronomy – declared Mars to be mystery ships’ home planet. Further evidence; papers found on deceased Martian contained script in undefinable hieroglyphics. A “Christian burial” scheduled the following day.

The incident was never mentioned in press again. Local legends tell of the mysterious metal craft partially buried with the “alien”, the rest tossed down Judge Proctor’s well. In 1945 the property was purchased by Brawley Oates who developed a acute case of arthritis after trying to clear debris out of the old well. Oates later sealed the well with a concrete slab and built a shed on top of it. The Texas Historical Commission erected a marker outside Aurora’s cemetery detailing the “legend”.

UFO enthusiasts, historians, and idle gawkers ponder events at Aurora with interest ranging from curiosity to conspiracy. Naturally no evidence exists – the legend lives on. Never mind original reports of a slow moving cigar shaped craft – think Zeppelins since they were the only aircraft of reference. Take folded papers containing Martian hieroglyphs with a grain of salt – obviously alien travellers carried note pads when crossing galaxies.

Hard as I ponder, I can’t think of one good reason why we need “proof” of alien visits. We can’t cope with our own nonsense let alone deal with ramifications of other worldly beings. Religion would bend it into utter nonsense, business would find ways to turn it into a cash cow and fear would make survivalist wing nuts look like the next best thing.

I’m perfectly happy in my belief we’re not alone – and equally convinced we couldn’t process the truth.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora,_Texas_UFO_Incident

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11 thoughts on “Aurora, Texas 1897

  1. Was it Asimov or Sagan who said the two scariest things would be to discover we were alone in the universe and the other would be to discover we were not.

    Or something like that…. 😉

    “It’s life, Jim, but not as we know it.”

      • I read Battlefield Earth when I was younger, and loved the Alien, Terl.
        That was the only thing of Dear Ole Ron I can say I ever read.
        The movie was horrendous.

        We have a Scientology ‘church’ a couple of miles from where I live; Johannesburg.
        When developers carved up a local golf course – Kensington- ( trees don’t pay rent, apparently)- the beautiful old clubhouse and a small amount of land was sold to the Scientologists.

        I don’t know if they ever manage a spot of golf as I believe all the land they got amounted to the practice putting green.

        Nutters with putters?
        😉

      • Battlefield Earth is the only movie I’ve ever walked out of the theatre on 🙂 As for those nutty putters – they managed to convince the U.S. they were a religion to recognize – the test being a religion has to demonstrate a “mission” to be granted tax exempt status. Scientology’s mission – the free personality test! Holy shit.

  2. I find it desperately hard to imagine a civilisation capable of building starships able to traverse the vast distances of space at hyper-speeds (meaning they’d have to have some sort of field protection, because hitting even a dust particle at those speeds is the equivalent of a small supernova) could make it into our atmosphere only to then crash into something, and burn.

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