A Rough Day For Notes

My line of work inhabits a peculiar realm. Far removed from normal, I teeter on the brink of absurd, and wouldn’t have it any other way. Explaining what I do (flawless execution of off-site catered events) falls woefully short of defining my profession. Hospitality scoffs at tidy little job descriptions. Forget regurgitated expectations, any fool could figure that out. Not for the faint of heart – reality demands a sense of humor, thick skin, willingness to change direction mid step while maintaining unflappable calm and finding solutions without losing control of bat shit situations.

I always start my staff training sessions the same way – “nothing you do in life will show you what you’re made of faster than the service industry”. Today, I was reminded of that.

Launching a full blown postmortem serves no purpose. Words couldn’t do justice to the magnitude of a truly rough day. Take my word – over thirty years in the business and I could count days this rough on one hand.

Tough as it was, all I feel is contentment. When faced with insurmountable odds, I had the pleasure of kicking adversity’s ass. Supported by equally fearless staff, this victory belongs to all of us. To any of you still standing – today wasn’t a day to gripe about. No need to retell gory details, or dwell on outrageous snippets – today proved what you’re made of.

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4 thoughts on “A Rough Day For Notes

    • Worse is feeling utterly helpless with no choice but to carry on. Extremely detailed outdoor wedding, oppressive heat, 2-3 staff short, 100 yards and a flight of stairs between the kitchen and service area. “Rough” is when you stop, try to prioritize then realize it doesn’t matter because every task is imperative and physically impossible with resources at hand – yet you manage to pull it off. šŸ™‚

  1. After working in a nursing home while in high school and currently working in EMS, I can relate to exactly how you feel. Those people who think they deserve all the attention in the world are so annoying. The amount of energy you’re spending on them that is unnecessary (especially if you have another patient who really does need your attention) becomes such an aggravating situation.

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