Staff Infection

As quarantine restrictions ease across North America, restaurant owners leapt on reopening despite regional restrictions on capacity and seating distance. On May 19th British Columbia allowed restaurants to open at 50% capacity. Enthusiastic public response filled patios to the brim, patrons wait in long lines hoping for a seat at normality’s table. Overnight, a palpable transformation played out across the city. Akin to getting out of jail, an inch of freedom gave way to miles of opportunity. I can so I will took root.

Yesterday, youngest son returned to work at a trendy Yaletown eatery.  Normal need not apply, patrons are splurging on bottle service, tipping with wild abandon and filling available seats until closing bell. His observations aren’t unique, permission to sit at restaurant tables amounts to viral imperative for familiar social surroundings.

Rejoice, sit with friends, drink draft beer, take comfort in health regulations requiring service staff to wear face masks. So great, right? Not so fast. What about the rights of service staff? Patrons don’t have to wear face masks, they’re not touching plates, glasses or cutlery of others. They don’t languish in a steamy dish pit, sweltering behind mandatory face masks as scalding steam covers them in particulate moisture. No big deal, what’s a handful of service staff compared to optics of economic revitalization?

Actually it’s a very big deal and frankly I’m appalled.

See the source image

 

7 thoughts on “Staff Infection

  1. “It can’t happen to me!”

    (A syndrome that keeps the armed forces filled and megalomaniacs in business—it’s always the other guy who will cop it, no?)

  2. It seems the focus has shifted to wearing face masks and not hand washing. There must be more money to be made in face masks and it makes things look more serious than they are. The masks do protect both ways since you’re not breathing in contaminated air. Too bad we did not take those kind of precautions when the 2009 flu came around. Maybe this flu would not have happened. By the way, I like your play on words in the title. I was going to tell you it should be ‘staph’ but after reading the article it made sense to use staff.

  3. What about the rights of service staff?

    […]

    …what’s a handful of service staff compared to optics of economic revitalization?

    NtP,

    I too share your shock and disappointment.

    Because the true seriousness and potential lethality of COVID-19 is so delayed, by at least 2-weeks from time of infection to possibly 3-6 weeks more in hospital after initial infection, people with no intelligent understanding of a deadly airborne virus which is STILL not fully understood by virologists and epidemiologists, life’s other distractions (like money, constant income/expenses) soon take top priority. For those whose foresight is very limited, very tunnel-visioned, public safety, family and friend’s safety, and even safety for self takes a back seat or is completely forgotten. “Safety” gets turned into the mentality of “What have you done for me/us lately” or in the last 48-hours? This is a very egocentric pathology sometimes disguised inside words like freedom or independence.

    For example, a significant part of the Texas population don’t know or remember NOTHING about the deadly 1918 Spanish Flu which killed 50-100 million people around the world and 500,000 to 850,000 in the U.S. Those U.S. numbers rival or surpass almost every war in which the U.S. has been involved!!!

    Another example of this ‘me, me, ME’ mentality is disguising illegal civil rebellion under racism. Case and point:

    https://www.wfaa.com/article/news/video-shows-large-crowds-outside-dallas-restaurant-dpd-and-code-enforcement-shut-it-down-after-multiple-complaints-owner-says-hes-being-targeted/287-8f683dde-fa9b-48be-bb65-59b8a8aa961c

    From a Dallas restaurant magazine and website about the incident where Dallas Police were called in:

    Tensions between a new restaurant in Uptown and its neighbors finally boiled over last night after police were called to disperse a large crowd that had gathered. Harris’ House of Heroes, which opened at the beginning of the year on McKinney Avenue and is owned by former New Orleans Saints player De’Vante Harris, has been the subject of numerous 911 calls due to large crowds since it first opened. Last night, cops were called to enforce limited occupancy rules in place due to the coronavirus pandemic.

    ABC News 8 reports that the business has an occupancy of 66, meaning that only 16 or so people — 25 percent — should have been inside last night. Video of the incident shows many more than 16 people standing outside the restaurant, but occupancy limits do not apply to patios or outdoor spaces, so long as social distancing is maintained.

    What is really, REALLY sad is that if or when one of these rebels have a parent, sibling, spouse, or their own child get infected—and potentially die—THEN they take it serious. But then it’s too late isn’t it? Why should it take deep feelings of regret and remorse to hit people between the eyes before the indiscriminate virus coldly takes that one irreplaceable life? It could’ve been avoided by exercising much better caution and judgement—which was warned and announced well in advance!—and much LESS self-centered greed and arrogance.

    Oh well, I guess some/many Homo sapien primates have that one genome malfunction called the Boiling Frog Syndrome. That’s some harsh Natural Selection going on right there isn’t it!? 😬

  4. Sigh. Some people will pay the ultimate price for the foolishness of others. It is the same, perhaps even more so, here in the U.S. I’m thoroughly disgusted with the whole thing, and with the side of humans that I’ve seen in the past 2-3 months. I do hope your son will be alright. I actually hope everyone will be alright, but we all know that is not going to happen. The U.S. will hit 100,000 deaths today … and nobody seems to care. People are more concerned with their own pleasure and convenience.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s