Northern Hemisphere Aurora Alert


As I write, streams of solar wind advance at 594.5 Km/second. Commanded by CH58+, a impressive coronal hole poised to deliver rare auroral punctuation as far south as Washington State, Idaho, Montana, Michigan and Minnesota.

Auroras happen when electrons energized by acceleration collide with Earth’s upper atmosphere. Acceleration allows energized electrons to follow Earth’s magnetic field downward to the poles. Anywhere from 80 – 500 Km above Earth’s surface, electrons collide with oxygen & nitrogen atoms, spiking the atoms’ energy. Soon after, atoms relax to their former energy state – relaxation creates light known as aurora borealis. Initially light forms an arc from horizon to horizon, within a few hours arcs twist and sway in upper atmosphere wind.

A geomagnetic storm warning issued by NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center, forecasts G1 (minor) activity August 31, increasing to G2 (moderate) September 1st as solar wind blows Earthward at 650 Km/second.

Its been years since space weather issued public alert of aurora over Greater Vancouver. Auroras are fickle, space weather makes no promises. That said, if you find yourself away from city lights with clear skies, don’t miss an opportunity for Aurora to wrap her arms around you. Once you meet Aurora, night skies become a source of wonder.

G1-G2 Watches 31 Aug-1 Sep, 2019

https://www.swpc.noaa.gov/

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCC0CLzCpM6nuLSAi1JNBjkA

Noctilucent Timelapse by Adrien Mauduit


Noctilucent clouds are a weather phenomenon unique to summer months at latitudes between 50 and 70 degrees north and south of the equator. Inhabiting the mesosphere at altitudes of 75-86 kilometers, science regards noctilucent as highest clouds in Earth’s atmosphere. Too faint to be seen in daylight, there’s good reason why they’re known as luminous or night shining clouds. Noctilucent clouds can only be illuminated by sunlight below the horizon at astronomical twilight when lower levels of the atmosphere are in Earth’s shadow. Learn more at – https://www.almanac.com/news/weather-news/it-came-outer-space

For immediate noctilucent gratification, ponder noctilucent perfection by Adrien Mauduit of Night Lights Films –

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCC0CLzCpM6nuLSAi1JNBjkA

Chemically Enhanced Aurora


On April 5 NASA scientists launched sounding rocket mission AZURE (Auroral Zone Upwelling Rocket Experiment) from Norway’s Andoya Space Center. Twin rockets deployed chemical tracers capable of allowing researchers to track the flow of neutral and charged particles during an active geomagnetic storm. Emergency service switchboards were inundated with UFO sighting hysteria – seems no one bothered to alert residents of AZURE’s chemical meddling.

Lights over Lapland  webcam operator Chad Blakely captured the first chemical puffs. Video below from Adrien Mauduit documents the spectacle.

 

Geomagnetic Bliss By Adrien Mauduit


From Adrien Mauduit at the Aurora observatory, Senja Island, Norway on March 17, 2019…

“It all started at around 10:00pm LT. Almost nothing until then when all of a sudden a big band appeared in the south. Around 10:30pm LT, a very nice show happened with some colorful and fast moving coronas.”

Adrien Mauduit is a visionary, an artist who captures the essence of Aurora in mesmerizing detail. Join me in appreciation of his vision by clicking on the link below and following Adrien Mauduit.

https://www.youtube.com/user/amadrien21

Winter Wonderland by Adrien Mauduit


 

Adrien Mauduit, my favorite timelapse photographer, posted Winter Wonderland a few days ago. Shot over three months in Senja, Norway, no one better than Adrien to preface a Winter Wonderland….

“Within the arctic circle the winters can be harsh with long-lasting violent blizzards. However when the snow storm lets up and passes, it leaves a completely transformed landscape. All the familiar roads, trees, mountains and lakes are buried under a layer of deep snow taking on different sort of weird shapes. The flimsy birch trees are bending under the weight and look like they are welcoming your into a fairy-tale. The moon and the windless atmosphere play such an important role in creating a winter wonderland. Most of the sequences of this short timelapse film were shot during an interval of 3 days where the snow stuck to the branches. Senja’s ever-changing weather had the best of this fleeting environment very quickly but it took over 3 months to shoot all the scenes of this movie.

I really wanted the viewer to feel like they actually were in a dream straight from their winter childhood memory. Much like Narnia or Frozen you can just walk through the enchanted frozen forest, lie down in the scintillating fresh powder looking up at the branches contrasting with the blue sky and the northern lights, and all surrounded by the mountains and the sea. From the pink sunrises and sunsets of the winter polar days to the ice figures created on the frozen shore by the converging tides, not to mention the incredibly colorful displays of aurora borealis, get ready to experience an uplifting voyage through the magical astroscapes of Northern Norway.

All was shot with the Sony a7rII, Sony a7s and the Canon 6D Baader modified and a variety of bright lenses ranging from 14mm to 150mm. I used the Lonely Speck Pure Night and Matt Aust Light pollution filters to reduce light pollution and increase details on the deep-sky scenes and also the Vixen Polarie to track the stars and get cleaner shots. For motion control I used the Syrp 3-axis Genie I system and also the Vixen Polarie. All post production was made in Lr with the special timelapse plus plugin, Sequence for mac, TLDF, and final production was made in FCPX. I hope you like the movie as much as I liked shooting and processing it and I thank everyone of you for your support. All content is of course copyrighted AMP&F (except sountrack licensed through The Musicbed: Steven Gutheinz with ‘In the Balance’), and no footage can be used in any way without the author’s permission. Please contact me for media and purchase inquiry. Please share and comment if you liked the video and follow me for more videos like this one! More at adphotography-online.com.” – Adrien Mauduit

Follow Adrien Mauduit at – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCC0CLzCpM6nuLSAi1JNBjkA