Have You Seen The Milky Way?


Born under starry skies, rural seclusion wrapped childhood in the Milky Way. Constant, permanent, watchful – I left for city lights without saying goodbye. We still see each other every few years, picking up where we left off like old friends do. When time comes to part I wave goodbye, mindful of cosmic wonders that shaped my life. Pondering the fact 80% of people alive today have never seen the Milky Way.

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/11/light-pollution/klinkenborg-text

 

Space Videos


My space geek swooned when idle YouTube navigation delivered the Amazing Space channel – one stop catalogue of cosmic magnificence. Regardless of mood or inclination, be it timelapse, Hubble, SDO, NASA, ESA, live feeds, JUNO orbiting Jupiter, ISS or 30 minutes of high definition solar artistry dubbed Thermonuclear Art – Amazing Space is the place.

http://https://www.youtube.com/user/ouramazingspace/featured

 

Five Bright Planets


Between January 20 – February 20, 2016 Mercury, Venus, Saturn, Mars and Jupiter will be visible to the naked eye – five bright planets in a row, for the first time since December 2004.

Beginning around January 20 - through mid-February - you can see five bright planets at once in the predawn sky.

View larger. | Beginning around January 20 – through mid-February – you can see five bright planets at once in the predawn sky.

Sleep is precious, so too is an opportunity to gaze at over half our planets in the theatre of pre-dawn’s quiet contemplation. Jupiter is first to rise in the early evening, followed by Mars after midnight, then Saturn, Venus and Mercury just before dawn. Those living in North America can click on the link below for precise rise and set time of moon, sun and planets depending on your location.

http://www.almanac.com/astronomy

The rest of you can use the next link. It requires a little patience and navigation to obtain longitude and latitude – but hey, you’ll learn your city’s coordinates along the way.

http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/mrst.php

http://earthsky.org/science-wire/when-will-all-five-visible-planets-appear-simultaneously?utm_source=EarthSky+News&utm_campaign=75402ed4f6-EarthSky_News&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c643945d79-75402ed4f6-393970565

Happy Mars Day


April 8, 2014 is “Mars Day”. Tonight Mars will be in “opposition” to the Sun – from an Earthly perspective, Mars appears opposite the Sun as Earth orbits between the two. Since orbits are uneven, all oppositions are not equal -this April Earth hurtles past Mars on its closest orbit since 2007. Tonight Mars practically begs us to look at night sky – it doesn’t matter where you live, Mars shines as brightly as any object in the sky.

Orbiting the Sun on tilted axis may result in seasons and polar caps, but little else in common with Earth. Liberal science fiction conjures images of a “red planet” – red equated with images of sweltering heat rather than an abundance of iron or knowledge of a -60 degree Celsius average temperature.  Home to Olympus Mons – three times taller than Mount Everest, soaring 27 Km. above the surface – the solar systems’ tallest peak.  The greatest valley, Valles Marineris, – 10 km. deep running for 4000 km., as well as raging dust storms lasting months at a time.

Mars is in front of the constellation Virgo.  Spica is Virgo's brightest star.  EarthSky Facebook friend Henrique Feliciano Silva in Lisbon, Portugal photographed Mars and its surrounding stars and created this great star map.  Thank you, Henrique!

Mars is in front of the constellation Virgo. Spica is Virgo’s brightest star. EarthSky Facebook friend Henrique Feliciano Silva in Lisbon, Portugal photographed Mars and its surrounding stars and created this great star map. Thank you, Henrique! View more photos by Henrique Feliciano Silva.

Our skies finally cleared allowing for this “screen shot” of Mars courtesy Google Sky Map on my android phone.

2014-04-08 23.29.45

Anyone who hasn’t put this app on their phone needs to do so immediately.

http://www.google.com/mobile/skymap/

Link to Mars facts….

http://earthsky.org/tonight/mars-at-opposition-out-from-sundown-until-sunup-on-april-8?utm_source=EarthSky+News&utm_campaign=cb62a43ecc-EarthSky_News&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c643945d79-cb62a43ecc-393970565

Where Did You Come From 2014 AA?


It’s no secret I check space weather every day; solar wind, chance of flares, active sun spots, list of PHA (potentially harmful asteroid) in the next few months. My eyes settled on 2014 AA, Jan.2, 2014, .001 LD  (1 LD = the distance from earth to the moon), 3 meters. Holy crap – this wasn’t here yesterday. Where did you come from 2014 AA? It seems I needn’t have bothered trying to calculate what .001 of 384,000 Kms. was, 2014 AA entered our atmosphere around midnight EST. Believed to have burned up over the Atlantic, somewhere off the east coast of Africa.

This rogue little space rock hadn’t even been discovered until New Years Day, 24 hours later it slams into our atmosphere. Another nugget of information presented itself – this is only the second time astronomers spotted an asteroid before it hit our atmosphere. The first time in 2008 when 2008 TC3 burned up over the Sudan, and coincidentally TC 3 wasn’t discovered until the day before impact.

http://earthsky.org/earth/small-asteroid-entered-our-atmosphere-just-hours-ago

There isn’t a lot any of us can do about falling space junk; I’m not pacing the floor, fretting about a doomsday asteroid. There isn’t much we could do about a sudden, unexpected projectile hurtling towards our planet. That said, I was truly shocked to learn only two asteroids have ever been detected before hitting our atmosphere. Currently spaceweather lists 1488 PHA’s ranging from a few meters to Km’s in width. Gravity and its pull, orbits, and trajectories are fickle, I’d be a much happier ponderer if we put a little more effort into more than 24 hours notice.

Image – skyandtelescope.com

Geminids and Gibbous Moons


When the Geminid meteor shower peaks on Dec. 13 and 14, a pesky, almost full moon is poised to steal fireball thunder. The annual Geminids are one of the most prolific night shows, with an average of 120 meteors an hour. As if losing ISON wasn’t bad enough; a bright winter moon is expected to reduce visible meteors 2 – 5 fold.

Annual meteor showers result from earth’s orbit intersecting debris from a sun orbiting comet. Radiant point, is the name given to this intersection. Debris from comet 3200 Phaethon happens to intersect our orbit in the vicinity of constellation Gemini, hence – Geminids. To find Gemini, look for the star Castor, low on the east, north-east sky around 9 PM. Castor is one of the brightest stars in the sky and along with Pollux, make up the ” twin brothers ” of Gemini. The reason Geminids produce so many visible meteors is that the constellation and radiant point swing upward; by 2 AM the point is directly above you in the sky. The angle of the radiant, translates into no poor seats for this show – you can see it from anywhere, with 2 AM as your prime time.

This year we have a waxing gibbous moon to deal with – not a deal breaker, but grounds for some new rules. Since the nearly full moon is so bright, you should wait until the moon sets. This year pre-dawn moon set offers the best view. Get out of town – away from city lights – and give yourself a few minutes to adjust to the darkness. Gibbous moon aside – I guarantee you’ll see fireballs – you don’t even have to find Gemini, the Geminids have a crazy way of appearing to come from any direction.

http://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentials/radiant-point-for-geminid-meteor-shower

To find out when the moon sets in your little corner of the world – a link…..

http://www.usno.navy.mil/USNO/astronomical-applications/data-services

Ponder the last time you wished upon a falling star.

Jupiter, Castor and Pollux rise at early-to-mid evening in early December but at dusk or nightfall  by the month's end.

Jupiter, Castor and Pollux rise at early-to-mid evening in early December but at dusk or nightfall by the month’s end.