Gavrinis


Most people have knowledge of Stonehenge; without question the daddy of Neolithic sites. A sprinkling know of Carnac; over 3000 carefully aligned stones – some of monolithic proportions, erected between 3300 – 4500 BC near the village of Carnac in France. Fewer still have uttered the word  Gavrinis.

Gavrinis, a tiny island off the coast of Brittany in France clung to the mainland between 3,500 and 5,000 BC., a time defined by burial tomb construction. Not more than a bumpy  outcropping of rock (750 by 400 meters) uninhabited Gavrinis slept undiscovered until 1835 when French archaeologists started poking about a sunken burial tunnel entrance. Serious excavation began in the 1930s.

Gavrinis defies explanation. Over 50 stone slabs form the entrance tunnel and inner chamber – curiously carved slabs begging for stand at attention while humming the theme from 2001 Space Odyssey reverence. Gut reaction to a mind blowing epic – Gavrinis is no ordinary Neolithic site..

Roughly half the slabs boast intricate carvings resembling fingerprints. Mathematicians  believe it’s a code of sorts. Computer analysis dropped a bombshell – patterns represent the number of days in a year, references to solstice and equinoxes, an exact longitude and latitude of the island, and the “mathematical constant Pi”.

Much as this makes me grin from ear to ear, I have to admit not everyone is on board.  Many mysteries of the ancient world find themselves living on book shelves in “wing nut” land. Irrefutable archaeological evidence hasn’t taken Gobekli Tepe or Puma Punku off the crazy shelf and into mainstream consciousness. If 16th century Turkish admiral Piri Reis could produce a map of Antarctica, precisely as it would appear without ice, yet wallow in conspiracy land – it’s doubtful Neolithic people at Gavrinis coding “Pi” into fingerprint carvings will make a ripple.

Call me a pondering fool, I don’t care.Not for a second do I entertain the notion “alien” or otherworldly intervention had anything to do with ancient head scratchers. I’m going to fall asleep with a silly little grin; content in the knowledge that ancient civilizations kicked ass.

http://www.ancient-code.com/earths-hidden-code/#

http://www.culture.gouv.fr/fr/arcnat/megalithes/en/mega/megagav_en.htm

Something Cool to Ponder


America’s Stonehenge is the name given to a site in Salem New Hampshire. Though it pales in comparison to it’s namesake, it has some rather interesting similarities The alignment of the stones mark the solstices – longest and shortest days of the year. The equinoxes – twice a year when the sun is over the equator, day and night are both 12 hours. Cross quarter days – falling exactly in the middle between the solstice and equinox. Finally – true north alignment.

Originally called Mystery Hill; a name given by William Goodwin who purchased the land in 1937, theories of its origin run from Goodwin’s belief it was proof that Irish monks lived in America before Columbus, to the Phoenicians paying America a visit. No one argues native americans inhabited the site, or that some of the stones have been moved. Goodwin attempted to stand some of the stones, convinced he was setting them in their original upright position.

Carbon dating places the site between two and four thousand years old. Without a doubt the clever name change from Mystery Hill to American Stonehenge has placed another roadside attraction on the map. When we think of Stonehenge an image of monolithic proportions comes to mind.  This place is nothing of the sort; roadside attraction is a clue to the hopeful business plan of the Stone family who now own the land.

Much hyped or over-rated doesn’t matter much to me, I’m willing to see beyond that. Say or think what you will but the fact remains – when the sun rises at the summer solstice it shines brightly on a marker in Salem, New Hampshire – just as it does at Stonehenge, England. However paltry America’s Stonehenge appears, the cosmic alignment is something cool to ponder.

Photo – crystalinks.com

Will O’ The Wisp


Halloween punctuates a very strange week. As fireworks crackle in the distance and the driving rain pounds my window – it is the Will O’ the Wisp that enters my pondering mind.

Will O’ The Wisp, by definition – a delusive or misleading hope – is also known in folklore as ignus fatuus, and jack-o-lantern. Throughout history a mysterious glowing light that appeared over bogs and marshes. Folk tales from England, Appalachia, to Newfoundland describe “Will” or “Jack” as protagonists doomed to haunt graveyards, swamps, and marshes for the evil deeds committed during their lives.

The first recorded attempt to explain the wisp was by Italian physicist Alessandro Volta in 1776; he attributed them to methane gas igniting over bogs and marshes. Many took issue as his theory couldn’t possibly explain why they seemed to move away as they were approached. Although his reasoning concluded that air was pushed forward by movement, exhaustive studies continued through the 18th and 19th centuries.

There is still no definitive explanation. Theories from chemical reaction, electric energy, to refraction of light abound. In Marfa, Texas  they are attributed to car or train lights in the distance.

http://earthsky.org/human-world/ghost-lights-believe-in-them-if-you-dare

Marfa lights viewing area this way

Marfa lights viewing area this way