Vancouver Faces, Dark Spaces


Two distinct photographic galleries shot by my husband. Vancouver faces, followed by dark spaces –

Dark spaces –

Explore more at – https://www.flickr.com/photos/15574096@N00/

Several weeks ago Literary Orphans, a Chicago based indie art/literary site asked permission to use his work as “featured artist” of the month. Several friends thought I wrote his introduction ( which I didn’t, but it echoes my sentiments to the letter )

“Thomas H’s photographs are deliberate and intentional. Each image opens up into a fantastic story of it’s own, painting a scene–a setting for a story to take place in. It makes you question and wonder and ponder the thought behind the lens. It’s impossible to view Thomas H’s work and not to take in the beauty of these vivid settings; be it a the serenity of a lush forest, or the personality of a painting balancing preposterously on a bench. Many of Thomas H’s photos portray instances and moments that immediately make you look for more–a man sneaking a drag from a cigarette outside on a bench, a station wagon on the side of the road with an open door. These photographs capture the sense of someone roaming the world they inhabit, finding the magic that others overlook.”

Link to Literary Orphans below –

http://www.literaryorphans.org/playdb/featured-artist-thomas-h/

 

Venus Bubbles


This is pretty cool – do a little space homework, find out when the Moon or planets appear in the direction of setting Sun. Take a piece of picture frame size glass outside at sunset. Find an appropriate place to fasten it between yourself and the setting sun. Sprinkle glass with drops of water. Focus your camera lens on the drops of water…….

Photographer John Bell of Haversham, Bucks, UK followed the recipe and obtained the picture above on Jan. 17, 2017.

“I had been looking at macro photos of flowers through droplets and thought I’d try the same with the evening sky,” explains Bell. “I taped a photoframe glass to a tree branch in my garden and framed the droplets using my Canon 5D MK2 with a sigma 106mm macro lens. The view was of Venus by a neighbour’s tree.”

Water droplets act as inverting lenses, so in the original photo the sunset was upside down. “Easily fixed,” says Bell, who restored order by rotating the image 180 degrees. “Focusing was a bit difficult,” he adds. “After all, water droplets are not perfect lenses.” The result, however, was perfectly beautiful. More exposures are available here.